RetroMacCast

Where great old Macs live again!

I was looking around on google shopping for a G4 Cube when i happened upon this.


From what I can tell it's an AirPort card, but what really gets me is what's printed on the thing, AirMac. If anyone knows of what this is or where it came from, please post what you know! (The attached file is a pic of the card.)

Views: 170

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

It's certainly the name I would use on my knock-off card if I made one. (Just an observation , not an accusation and I could be wrong. I've never seen real card.)
Could it have been called this in some other country? Or it could just be a WaveLan card with a homemade sticker so it sells better. Some early AirPort Base Stations actually had those inside! http://www.msrl.com/airport-gold/airport-cardswap.gif
Yeah, i knew about the WaveLAN inside the graphite ABS's, and when i finally get the adapter for the iMac before i put the AirPort in i will see if it will work. I believe it will because putting the WaveLan card in the Snow ABS works. This will probably only work in the iMac and possible the G4 towers (i don't know how they go into the G4s) because the rest of the Macs don't have the space for the top bit. Also, there are WaveLAN cards without an antenna that look just like the airport cards (like your/ second pic) and this one card made by Sony that the antenna unclips and they can be used.
Gah, the WaveLAN silver/Gold cards with the inbuilt antenna won't fit in the iMac, the tab for the RAM slot nearest the AirPort slot is in the way of the plastic bit. Still might work in the G4 towers though, can anyone help confirm this?
AirMac is (or was?) the name given to AirPort products in Japan. I saw Steve himself announce things this way while watching the Macworld Tokyo 2001 keynote...
Yeah, the good folks in ##mac in irc.freenode.org told me this about 5 minutes after I posted this.

RSS

Badge

Loading…

© 2021   Created by James.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service